Posted by glynis


Stratford-upon-Avon Death Cafe

Hosted by The Shakespeare Hospice


Date:

May 14, 2017

Start time:

3:00 p.m. (BST)

End time:

5:00 p.m. (BST)

Address:

Lifeways Centre

30 Albany Road

Stratford-upon-Avon

CV37 6PG

United Kingdom

Cost:

This event is free, but donations are gratefully received to cover hiring costs.

This Death Cafe has taken place

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About this Death Cafe

We're especially happy to be running this event in Dying Matters Awareness Week. This is not a bereavement group, nor group therapy, but a chance to contribute and listen to different perspectives, while enjoying delicious tea and cake.

It is extremely helpful to have an indication of numbers attending. Please book your place by using the contact details below.

There are people who are keen to explore the subject from different standpoints and have lively conversation about it whilst enjoying delicious coffee and cake.  This is not a bereavement group, nor is it group therapy, it is an open forum to talk about a taboo subject - See more at: http://deathcafe.com/deathcafe/2841/#sthash.R1eekZxZ.dpuf


About The Shakespeare Hospice

The Shakespeare Hospice in Stratford-upon-Avon are holding a Death Cafe as part of Dying Matters Awareness Week.

The event will be led by Glynis Fletcher, a person-centred counsellor, with many years of experience in bereavement and palliative care, who had led Death Cafes at Lifeways since 2014.

We welcome this opportunity to provide a forum for open discussion on all topics around death, dying, life and living. We invite you to join us for tea, cake and conversation, sharing experiences, thoughts and wishes, in a friendly and supportive setting. Lifeways is a beautiful venue in which to share uplifting and life-affirming conversation. We look forward to meeting you.

I'm a Person-Centred counsellor with many years experience of working in the area of dying and bereavement.  I have worked with families, children and hospice staff in a counselling and supervising role. I found that in both my personal and professional experiences of death I was saddened that opportunities for open and useful discussions were often missed. Relatives and friends were often deeply regretful and the grieving process made especially complicated.  

I welcome this movement for developing a 'more friendly relationship with death', and find each meeting enlightening, fulfilling and life-affirming.    

- See more at: http://deathcafe.com/deathcafe/757/#sthash.0IVEEJRG.dpuf

I'm a Person-Centred counsellor with many years experience of working in the area of dying and bereavement.  I have worked with families, children and hospice staff in a counselling and supervising role. I found that in both my personal and professional experiences of death I was saddened that opportunities for open and useful discussions were often missed. Relatives and friends were often deeply regretful and the grieving process made especially complicated.  

I welcome this movement for developing a 'more friendly relationship with death', and find each meeting enlightening, fulfilling and life-affirming.    

- See more at: http://deathcafe.com/deathcafe/757/#sthash.0IVEEJRG.dpuf

 


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